True Southern Comfort Blood

soso

Southern Comfort is celebrating its sponsorship of the Golden Globe winning series True Blood, Season Two with a selection of blood thirsty cocktails that promises to make the mouth of any mere mortal water.

The recipes are in European measures. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a jigger with both standard and metric measures? Just a thought.

sookie-swizzle-low-res

The Sookie Swizzle

50ml Southern Comfort
3 wedges Blood Orange
3 wedges lemon
15ml Sugar syrup
Dash of Peychaud’s Bitters

Served in a large rocks over crushed ice, muddle fruit and build in glass.

merlott-punch-low-res

Southern Merlotte’s Punch

35ml Southern Comfort
15ml Lemon Juice
25ml Apple Juice
50ml Merlot red wine
15ml Sugar syrup
1/2 blood orange (squeezed)
Dash of Peychaud’s Bitters

Shake and strain into a High Ball glass over cubed ice. Serve with a blood orange and lemon slice and garnish with mint sprig.

sc-over-ice-with-orange
Southern Blood

50ml Southern Comfort
½ blood orange
Ice

Fill a glass halfway with ice and pour the Southern Comfort over. Squeeze the juice of half a blood orange and stir for a true taste of New Orleans, where Southern Comfort originates.

HISTORY
Southern Comfort was created in 1874 by a New Orleans bartender, Martin Wilkes (M.W.) Heron. After experimenting with a variety of fruits, spices and other spirits, Heron struck on the perfect combination creating a one-of-a-kind blend of nuetral grain spirit, fruit, and spice flavors. His spirit of originality, freedom and possibility continues to live through the Southern Comfort brand to this day.

TRIVIA
• Southern Comfort was originally known as Cuff and Buttons.
• Southern Comfort was Janis Joplin’s favorite. She mixed it with lime juice.
• Southern Comfort won the gold medal at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis.
• The Scarlett O’Hara (SoCo, cranberry juice & lime) was marketed in 1939 after the film, Gone with the Wind.
• The most popular drinks made with SoCo is the Alabama Slammer and Sloe Comfortable Screw.

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Filed under Cocktails in Film & Other Media, Recipes

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